Pembury War Memorial

 

The War Memorial in Hastings Road was unveiled and dedicated on Sunday 25 September 1921 by Rev. H. Sinclair Brooke, MA (Vicar of Pembury 1898-1918). He would have known many of those who gave their lives in WW1. The site was given by the Marquis Camden, and the Portland Stone Memorial stands 16 ft high, and cost £365/19/4d, which apparently took quite a long time to raise. It was designed by well-known local architects Ashley S. Kilby and the work was executed by Messrs. Burslem and Sons of Tunbridge Wells. The Service (programme in Pembury Library) included the Last Post and Reveille and the National Anthem at the end of the Service. The Roll of Honour was read by Mr. C.R. Bosanquet.

A copy of the Service programme (Link Here) has now been kindly donated by Pembury Library

The WW1 names were originally engraved on a stone plaque. After WW2, when a second plaque was needed, it was decided to have two matching bronze plaques- one to go over the top of the existing stone one, and a new one underneath for the names from WW2. A report in the Kent & Sussex Courier on 13th July 1945 states that at the Parish Council Meeting Mr. H. Parkes “drew attention to the disgusting state of the present memorial, declaring that they all ought to be ashamed of themselves”.

In 2018 the Parish Council, who own the Memorial agreed to an Appeal to raise money to refurbish the Memorial. The bronze plaques were very tarnished, and Richard Snow discovered that 8 of the names were misspelt. In addition the Council had been approached to add Jim Woodhams to the list of those who died in WW1.

The misspelt names –

Albert Mc’Queen ( should be McQueen.)

Albert and Thomas Penticost (should be Pentecost)

Sydney Ratcliffe (should be Sidney)

Edward Crossley (should be Edmund)

William Parks (should be Parkes)

John Philbeam (should be Pilbeam).

Douglas Mac-Dougall (should be MacDougall)

Jim H. Woodhams (WW1)  added.

 

The refurbishing was carried out by Burslems. The work included taking off the existing plaques, engraving new stone plaques and replacing them on the War Memorial. The surrounding stone was re-pointed and the Memorial cleaned. The money to allow this to be undertaken was generously given by Council grants (County and Parish), The Pembury Society, businesses, local residents and relatives of the fallen.

The refurbished War Memorial was unveiled on Remembrance Sunday – 11.11.2018, which also marked the end of the last year of the Centenary of WW1. 2018’s Remembrance Sunday service and unveiling of the plaques took place around the War Memorial. Details of the 2018 preparation, memorial unveiling and service are shown lower down this page.

Most of the 2018 activities regarding the memorial and the commemorative service were driven by Richard Snow. Pembury owes him a big thank you for his hard work organising and co-ordinating all the various events and tasks.

 

 

The original Memorial

 

 

 

The original Memorial

 

Above & Below –  Metal name plates added to the memorial for amendments and corrections.

Photos by Richard Snow


Preparation for the Memorial renovation in 2018

The photographs of the cleaning and carving by Burslem of Tunbridge Wells were taken by Richard Snow in September 2018

 

Carving the new WW1 plaque at Burslem in Tunbridge Wells.  Note it is common practice not to fill the engraved text.

 

 

 

 

 


The following photos were taken by Richard Snow on Friday 26 October 2018 after the removal of the WW1 metal plate.
The metal plate was produced in 1949 to rectify name omissions and spelling errors carved into the stone.

Above:  the metal plate removed.
During this exercise the police were called because locals thought the monument was being vandalised.

 

Above:  the removal of the metal plate revealing the original inscriptions.

 

           Above:   Parkes without the ‘e’
Both Penticosts spelt with ‘e’.    The metal replacement had them both spelt with an ‘i’.

 

Above:   Sidney Ratcliffe as Sydney

 

Above:    2nd Nov 2018   Both metal plaques removed, damage filled, awaiting replacements.

 

Above:    2nd Nov 2018   WW2 plaque fitted.

 

Above:  Richard Snow with knitted poppies – 2nd Nov 2018

 

 Below:   Preparation on the Village Green  on 7th Nov

 

 

Above:   Burslem’s fitters working on the memorial   7th Nov

 

Above:   Burslem’s fitters unloading the WW1 plaque     7th Nov

 

 

Above:  Richard Snow taking delivery of the WW1 plaque

 


 

Above:   Burslem’s fitters preparing for the final installation  –  7th Nov 2018
7th Nov photographs taken by Tony Nicholls


 

WW1- Names for new Plaques (2018) – Pembury War Memorial

Edward Arnold Harry Mercer
Stephen Baldock Walter Morphett
George Barden Charles Nurden
George Batcheller Joseph Pankhurst
Arthur Chatfield Charles Penn
Murray Christie D.S.O. Albert Pentecost
Harry Clarke Thomas Pentecost
James A. Doust Frederick Piper
Arthur G. Ellis Albert Prall
Albert Field William A. Parkes
Charles Fry Percy Ratcliffe
William Fry Sidney A. Ratcliffe
John Galpin John Raynes
Sidney Giles Arthur Roberts
John Grainger Harry Roberts
Charles Hicks James Sivyer
Leslie Kemp D. Gordon Smith
Samuel Kemp John Stedman
Thomas Kemp Stephen Stevens
Charles Lawrence Horace J. Stroud M.M.
Charles Leonard Alfred Thompsett
Douglas R. MacDougall Victor Valentine
Albert A. McQueen Frank Vater
Ronald E. Martin Jim H. Woodhams
William Martin Harry Young

 

 

WW2- Names for new Plaques (2018) – Pembury War Memorial

Vincent Ashford George Hide
Richard Bassett-Burr Arthur George Mepham
Herbert Frank Brown Francis Murphy
Jack George Cavie William Parkes
Joseph Clifton Philip Peart
Robert Philip Cole John Pilbeam
Thomas George Cook Brian Pilgrim
Edmund Forbes Crossley Thomas Reader

 

 

Link to the 2018 Service of Remembrance programme

Link to the 1921 programme, kindly donated by Pembury Library

 

Below – Photos of Sunday 11th Nov 2018     taken by Anne Nicholls

Above – Photos of Sunday 11th Nov 2018     taken by Anne Nicholls

 

Below – Photos of Sunday 11th Nov 2018     taken by Jenny Kimber







Above – Photos of Sunday 11th Nov 2018     taken by Jenny Kimber

 

Below – Photos of Sunday 11th Nov 2018     taken by Rob Sanders

Above – Photos of Sunday 11th Nov 2018     taken by Rob Sanders

 


On Thursday 6th December there was a showing of David Dore’s film “Pembury Remembers” at the Baptist Church in Romford Road.


Link to Richard Snow’s Articles on Pembury’s War Heroes – Articles Page,   Item 002


War Memorial date of 1919

The sharp eyed observer will note that the Pembury Memorial records the First Word War as between 1914-1919.
The common understanding is 1914-1918.   Here is the explanation given by The War Memorials Trust –

First World War dates on war memorials 
1914-1918 are the most common dates for the First World War found on war memorials obviously commemorating the year the war commenced and the year the armistice was declared, on 11th November 1918. However, it is not unusual to find the dates 1914-1919 on First World War memorials. The 1919 date refers to the year when the Treaty of Versailles was signed. This was the peace treaty drawn up by the nations who attended the Paris Peace Conference and officially ended the state of war between Germany and the Allied Powers when it was signed on 28th June 1919.
Some war memorials also feature the dates 1914-1921, although this is less common. On 25th August 1921 the United States of America signed a separate peace treaty with Germany, the Treaty of Berlin.
As explained above, there are no ‘rules’ for war memorial inscriptions so any of these dates are correct as the local community decided to use the dates which were most appropriate.

 

Feedback and Comments following the 2018 Commemoration publicity

 

Nov 2018 – a descendant of William Alexander and William Arthur Parkes wrote:
“I was both pleased and wistful when I read of the Remembrance Parade in Pembury last week on the 11th November.  It was wonderful to see the work done to renovate the memorial and correct the misspelling of some of the fallen including my ancestor, William Parkes (in fact William Arthur Parkes).  Had I known about it I would have been there with my family (instead of looking after my Beaver Scouts at our Remembrance Parade in Surrey!).
I have been researching my family members and my Great Great Uncle was William Alexander Parkes, his son William Arthur Parkes was a pilot killed in WW2, he is also remembered on the memorial in Singapore.  Kathleen (nee Ellis), William Alexander’s wife, having been widowed, brought up my grandmother Ellen (who was her neice) alongside William and we have some photographs of him.  My grandmother was in the Auxiliary Territorial Service manning the guns on the south coast during WW2, she met my grandfather who was an 8th Army desert rat and after another generation here I am.
I am still researching my family history and will shortly be putting an account together with some photographs.  I would very much like to visit the Memorial (perhaps next Remembrance Parade?) and lay a wreath on behalf of my family.  We have William Alexander’s death plaque and continue to hunt for more information so any that you have more locally would be very gratefully received.
May I thank you for all the work you are doing regarding the history of Pembury, without it I would not have known about the work done on the Memorial and I feel very proud and privileged to know one of my ancestors is remembered there.
Best Regards,
The nee Ellis/Parkes family”

 

 

 

 


Page compiled by Tony Nicholls